Book Presentation Environmental Sustainability in Transatlantic Perspective with Authors and Editors

Book Presentation and Panel Discussion with Authors and Editors.  Environmental Sustainability in Transatlantic PerspectiveFriday 22 Nov  New Campbell Hall. 4:00 – 5:30 PmImage

Featured Essay: Designing for the Anthropocene: The Duisburg Rhine Park by Jorg Sieweke

“The task of building more energy-efficient, climate-friendly and sustainable societies is the defining challenge of the 21st century. Striving to become the world’s first major renewable energy economy by 2050, Germany is a global front runner in environmental policy and practice. Requiring massive investments in green technologies and infrastructure, Germany’s ambitious shift from fossil fuels and nuclear power to renewables requires nothing less than an ‘energy revolution.’ How and why did Europe’s largest economy embrace a challenge that has been compared to the first landing on the moon? What does this transition entail? Is the German experience transferable to other industrialized nations such as the United States? Experts from business, academia, governmental agencies and non-profit think tanks offer multi-disciplinary perspectives on the experiences behind and the challenges ahead. They open up new viewpoints and avenues for shared insight on environmental governance, energy security, technological innovation, green landscape and urban design, as well as on the possibilities for transatlantic partnership and cooperation.”

Published by: paradoXcity

Jorg Sieweke is licensed as landscape architect and urban designer in Berlin. He founded and directs the design-research initiative paradoXcity in 2010. He held professorships at University of Virginia and Visiting professor at RWTH Aachen and HCU Hamburg in Germany. He was fellow at Villa Massimo the German academy in Rome in 2015. His award winning firm challenges convention of practice in landscape architecture to establish its own trajectory of a landscape & urbanism. His PhD reflects the paradigm.

Categories News, Public Urban Infrastructure, re-use, urban metabolismLeave a comment

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